11Aug Time-effect study on instant analgesic effect of the dragon-tiger fighting needling method on primary dysmenorrhea. Comments are closedPosted by
Zhongguo Zhen Jiu. 2013 Nov;33(11):1005-9.

Time-effect study on instant analgesic effect of the dragon-tiger fighting needling method on primary dysmenorrhea.

[Article in Chinese]
Huyou-Ping1, Zhang X2, Zhang LX3, Wu J3, Wang Z3, Jia XF3, Tang Y3, Hui RT3.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To observe the clinical analgesic efficacy and the relation between clinical analgesic effect and duration of effect of two acupuncture methods of Longhu Jiaozhan (fight of dragon and tiger, an acupuncture reinforcing and reducing manipulation characterized with nine counterclockwise and six clockwise rotations) and even manipulations.

METHODS:

Sixty-two patients with primary dysmenorrhea were randomly divided into an observation group (32 cases) and a control group (30 cases). The observation group was applied with Longhu Jiaozhan manipulation, while the control group was applied with even manipulation. Acupuncture treatment was given on both of the groups since onset of the pain. The score of the visual analogue scale (VAS) of the 2 groups was observed at different times. And 8 VAS values were recorded at the point right before acupuncture, needle remaining of 5 min, 10 min, 20 min and 30 min as well as and 30 min, 60 min, 120 min after needle withdrawal. Comparison was made on differences between the 2 groups.

RESULTS:

Comparison with the same group before acupuncture showed that the VAS difference of the time from needling remaining of 5 min to 120 min after acupuncture were all with statistic significance (all P<0. 01). The score of VAS of needle remaining for 20 min and 30 min of the observation group was without significant difference (P>0. 05). The score of VAS value of needle remaining for 20 min and 30 min of the control group was with significant difference (P<0. 01). Comparison of the VAS scores before the treatment and the scores of the 2nd menstrual cycle were found with significant difference (P<0. 01). The VAS score of 2nd menstrual cycle was (28. 73 +/- 16. 15) in the observation group, which was better than (46. 93+/-12. 18) in the control group (P<0. 001). Comparison of the VAS score of the two groups at 5 min r emaining of the needle was without statistic significance between two groups (P>0. 05). However, the VAS impairment magnitude difference at that moment was with statistic significance (P<0.01). From the time of needle remaining for 10 min, 20 min, 30 min until 120 min after needling, the differences of the VAS scores and impairment range were all with statistic significance (all P<0. 01). The effects of the two acupuncture techniques could both be maintained up to 2 hours after needling.

CONCLUSION:

Both methods of acupuncture have immediate and long-term analgesic effect in a certain degree on primary dysmenorrhea. However, compared with the control group, the advantage of analgesic effect in the observation group is significantly superior. 20 min needling remaining can reach the best analgesic effect.
Acupuncture and Massage Therapy in Bath, Maine 04530. Richard A. Connell, Licensed Acupuncturist. Megan Connell, Licensed Massage Therapist. Bath, Brunswick and all Midcoast Maine.

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